Neem Seed Oil’s Numerous Benefits

The oil of Neem is absolutely wonderful. It is renowned world over, all the ones who once started to use the oil, still continue to do so for its various amazing health benefits. By health I mean the external as well as internal health of a being.

The Neem Tree (Azadirachta indica) also known as indian lilac or margosa) probably originated in India or Burma. Neem is a large, fast-growing evergreen that can reach approximately 40 to 80 feet (12 to 24 m) in height. The tree is drought resistant and heat tolerant, and may live up to 200 years. It grows in many Asian countries, as well as tropical areas of the western hemisphere. Neem oil, which is extracted from the tree’s seeds, has been used for its medicinal and insecticidal properties for more than 4,000 years.

Since ancient times, man has utilized neem products for their pest-repellent properties. Neem has been shown to ward off sand flies and mosquitoes, aiding in control of the spread of diseases such as malaria. Neem oil has been used to treat lice and scabies, and tea brewed from the leaf of the tree employed as a termite control. Neem leaves placed in the pockets of woolen clothing are said to fend off moths; added to stored grains and beans, they help keep insects out. Neem products are included in some dog soaps and shampoos to repel fleas and ticks, and used as a cattle-feed supplement to kill parasites. The application of neem derivatives to bags and stored grains provides safe and relatively inexpensive protection against -

  • Insect pests
  • Fungus
  • Rats
  • Reducing post-harvest losses in developing countries

Neem is considered harmless to humans, animals, birds, beneficial insects and earthworms, and has been approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency for use on food crops. Azadirachtin and other active ingredients in the neem seed have insecticidal properties that are effective against a broad spectrum of insects, many mites and nematodes, and even snails and fungi, and do not seem to generate resistance in the pests they affect.

Neem products do not provide absolute insect control, but frequent applications can reduce pest populations dramatically by repelling them; inhibiting their larval development, growth, fertility, mating and egg laying, and deterring feeding. A solution of neem oil smothers insect pests and has antifungal properties as well — the oil coats the plant’s surface and prevents the germination of fungal spores. Neem oil can also be used as a safe, natural leaf polish.

Have a look at our reference links now -

  1. Neem Seed Oil by Buzzle
  2. Neem by Hub Pages
  3. Neem by Livestrong

Bitter Better Neem

Neem essential oil is illustrious all over the world for its various medicinal and therapeutic properties and qualities. The first ones in the world to discover and bring this amazing herb to use were Indians. The oil is so full of uses and benefits for everyne sufferig from any kind of problem.

Neem tree fruit looks a bit like olives. It contains one seed, which in turn can have one or several kernels.

Oil is produced by crushing and pressing the kernels, and then purifying the extract.

Raw neem oil has a strong, pungent odour, often described as similar to sulphur and garlic. Yes, it definitely reeks.

It’s not enough to ask: “What is neem oil?” Before you buy or use neem oil you should also ask, “What kind of neem oil is this?”.

Just like there are differences in the quality of olive oil, there are also huge differences in the quality of neem seed oil. And just like with olive oil, cold pressed neem oil is good. Heat destroys the active ingredients.

For centuries millions of people have benefited from using various parts of the neem tree. Its recognized traditional uses are being confirmed by modern research findings. During the last 20 years more than 2000 research papers have been published on neem in journals, books and proceedings of international congresses.

Neem tree in totality has been a village dispensary and a qualified plant by itself. Every part of this plant finds use as medicine for

  • Itching
  • Skin disease
  • Leprosy
  • Blood disorders
  • Worms
  • Diabetes
  • Piles
  • Dysentery
  • Jaundice
  • Vomiting
  • Wounds
  • Eye disease
  • Paraplegia
  • Female genital diseases
  • All kinds of fevers

More than 150 compounds have been so far isolated from neem. Out of these seed accord for 101 including 43 from the malodorous fraction, the leaves 37; and flowers, bark and root furnish the rest (Dhan Prakash et al, 1996).

How your neem oil has been purified is also important. There are different purification methods. Some can leave traces of organic solvents and petrochemicals. Those can cause allergies.

Other purification methods remove most of the insecticidal properties. It says neem oil on the bottle, but it is actually a neem oil extract.

Neem oil has many uses, and what neem oil is best for you depends on how you want to use it.

Okay now have a look at our reference links now -

1. Neem tree-Azadirachta indica by Steve Nix
2. Neem- The village pharmacy by vedicheritaginc.com
3. Neem_ Village Pharmacy by www.neemtree.info

Neem Seed Oil’s Extensive Help

Neem seed essential oil is known for its various therapeutic qualities that are just great at doing their chore. The oil is strong and has quite a bitter taste but thats probably the only so-called drawback of its. The oil is highly antiseptic in nature.

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Neem oil is derived by pressing the seed kernels of the neem tree. It is very bitter with a garlic/sulfur smell. A single seed may contain up to 50 percent oil by weight. Neem oil is an excellent moisturizing oil and contains various compounds that have insecticidal and medicinal properties. It is used in making -

  • Shampoos
  • Toothpaste
  • Soaps
  • Cosmetics
  • Mosquito repellants
  • Creams and lotions
  • Pet products like pet shampoo

It also contains vitamin E, other essential amino acids and some percentages of fatty acids. Neem oil is used for treating many skin diseases viz. eczema, psoriasis, skin allergies, etc. and is being studied for making contraceptives in India.

Neem oil is a vegetable oil pressed from the fruits and seeds of Neem (Azadirachta indica), an evergreen tree which is endemic to the Indian subcontinent and has been introduced to many other areas in the tropics. It is perhaps the most important of the commercially available products of neem for organic farming and medicines.

Neem oil is not used for cooking purposes but, in India and Bangladesh, it is used for preparing cosmetics (soap, hair products, body hygiene creams, hand creams) and in Ayurvedic, Unani and folklore traditional medicine, in the treatment of a wide range of afflictions. The most frequently reported indications in ancient Ayurvedic writings are skin diseases, inflammations and fevers, and more recently rheumatic disorders, insect repellent and insecticide effects.

Traditional Ayurvedic uses of neem include the treatment of Acne, fever, leprosy, malaria, ophthalmia and tuberculosis. Various folk remedies for neem include use as an anthelmintic, antifeedant, antiseptic, diuretic, emmenagogue, contraceptive, febrifuge, parasiticide, pediculocide and insecticide. It has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of tetanus, urticaria, eczema, scrofula and erysipelas. Traditional routes of administration of neem extracts included oral, vaginal and topical use. Neem oil has an extensive history of human use in India and surrounding regions for a variety of therapeutic purposes. Puri (1999) has given an account of traditional uses and therapeutic indications and pharmacological studies of this oil, in his book on neem.

Go through these reference links now -

  1. Neem Seed Oil by Buzzle
  2. Neem by Hub Pages
  3. Neem by Livestrong

 

Peep In The Past – Neem

There has been an inseparable connection between neem and ayurveda. The highly antiseptic and therapeutic qualities of both of these are the reasons that there is so much demand of both of these in the world market.

 Various parts of the neem tree have been used as traditional Ayurvedic medicine in India. Neem oil and the bark and leaf extracts have been therapeutically used as folk medicine to control leprosy, intestinal helminthiasis, respiratory disorders, constipation and also as a general health promoter. Its use for the treatment of rheumatism, chronic syphilitic sores and indolent ulcer has also been evident. Neem oil finds use to control various skin infections. Bark, leaf, root, flower and fruit together cure blood morbidity, biliary afflictions, itching, skin ulcers, burning sensations and pthysis.

 Neem has been highly successfully against harmful fungi, parasites, and viruses. Although it can destroy these, it does not kill off beneficial intestinal flora nor produce adverse side effects.

Neem is toxic to several fungi that attack humans, including the causes of athlete’s foot and ringworm and candida, which cause yeast infections and thrush. In fact, neem extracts are some of the most powerful Antifungal plant extracts found in the Indian pharmacopia that are used for these conditions.

 The compounds gedunin and nimbidol, found in the tree’s leaves, control the fungi listed above. Basing their studies on the ancient tradition of using neem to purify the air surrounding sick people, two Indian researchers found that neem smoke was successful in suppressing fungal growth and germination.

One of neem’s stronger advantages is its effect upon the skin in general. It has been most helpful in treating a variety of skin problems and diseases including psoriasis, eczema and other persistent conditions.

According to a report from the National Research Council’s Ad Hoc Panel of the Board on Science and Technology for International Development, neem preparation from the leaves or oils can be used as general antiseptics.

 Because neem contains antibacterial properties, it is highly effective in treating epidermal conditions such as acne, psoriasis and eczema. It is also used for treating -

  • septic sores

  • infected burns

  • scrofula

  • indolent ulcers

  • ringworm

Stubborn warts can be cleared up when a high-quality neem product is used.Unlike synthetic chemicals that often produce side effects such as rashes, allergic reactions, or redness, neem doesn’t seem to create any of these results.

 Have a look at our reference links now -

1. Neem tree-Azadirachta indica by Steve Nix
2. Neem- The village pharmacy by vedicheritaginc.com
3. Neem_ Village Pharmacy by www.neemtree.info

Grand Old Golden Neem

As a kid I often saw my grandfather chew twigs of Neem, I was pretty fascinated, tried doing the same…And seriously I cannot tell you the olfactory experience I went through!!

It was puke-inducing! Gross!

All that my mom tells me today is that I made a face as if I had been ducked in pool of faeces for a good number of seconds!

Okay, I know it sounds a tad exaggerated but then again I had to share the experience as explicitly as possible…Anyway…getting back, but one thing I surely remember nicely…till he breathed his last, he had teeth stronger than what they in toothpaste commercials.

But, with this story, don’t think I am simply trying to focus on the dental aspect of Neem, there is much more to this amazing medicinal herb than just the maintenance of dental health,

The Neem tree (Azadirachta indica) is a tropical evergreen tree native to India and is also found in other southeast countries. In India, neem is known as “the village pharmacy” because of its healing versatility, and it has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for more than 4,000 years due to its medicinal properties. Neem is also called ‘arista’ in Sanskrit- a word that means ‘perfect, complete and imperishable’. The seeds, bark and leaves contain compounds with proven uses namely…

  • Antiseptic
  • Antiviral
  • Antipyretic
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Anti-ulcer
  • Antifungal

The Sanskrit name ‘nimba’ comes from the term ‘nimbati syasthyamdadati’ which means ‘to give good health’.

The earliest documentation of neem mentioned the fruit, seeds, oil, leaves, roots and bark for their advantageous medicinal properties. These benefits are listed in the ancient documents ‘Carak- Samhita’ and ‘Susruta-Samhita’, the books at the foundation of the Indian system of natural treatment, Ayurveda. Neem has a garlic-like odor, and a bitter taste. The various parts of this tree have many uses that aptly give neem its name in Sanskrit-“sarva roga nivarini”, meaning ‘the curer of all ailments’. Some of the most important documented uses of various parts of the neem tree are:

Neem oil is extracted from the seeds of the neem tree and has insecticidal and medicinal properties due to which it has been used for thousands of years in pest control, cosmetics, medicines, etc. Please see neem oil & its uses for detailed information.

Neem seed cake (residue of neem seeds after oil extraction) when used for soil amendment or added to soil,  not only enriches the soil with organic matter but also lowers nitrogen losses by inhibiting nitrification. It also works as a nematicide.

Neem leaves are used to treat chickenpox and warts by directly applying to the skin in a paste form or by bathing in water with neem leaves. In order to increase immunity of the body, neem leaves are also taken internally in the form of neem capsules or made into a tea. The tea is traditionally taken internally to reduce fever caused by malaria. This tea is extremely bitter. It is also used to soak feet for treating various foot fungi.  It has also been reported to work against termites. In Ayurveda, neem leaves are used in curing neuromuscular pains. Neem leaves are also used in storage of grains.

I am sure you would want to check out our reference links…

  1. Neem Oil For Hair by Livestrong
  2. Neem Oil by buzzle.com
  3. Home Remedies With Neem by Hub Pages

Neem has a Cooling Effect

Neem- The “Coolest” Herb!

Doesn’t it feel just out of this world when you’ve had a minty chewing-gum or sore throat toffee and then you suddenly have water…it feels like your throat is on nice…or maybe your throat has been exposed to some air conditioner…
Surprisingly neem has a kinda similar effect on any part of our body with applied in the right manner…
you already must be knowing that neem has been illustrious for its medicinal properties from quite some time now…erm…okay by that ‘some’ i mean some 2000 years!  And it was India that originally originated it’s use…and hence the neem tree soon was revered for its benefits & helps…
1. Its roots stretch wide and deep…not just ayurveda but also unani and homeopathy
2. Major reason it’s called ‘the village pharmacy’

In layman’s terms neem has an amazing understanding of reproductive system…the GI tract….the respiratory system…..and the circulatory system..and cools them down all when either of them under strain..

It kicks the immunity of a being a notch higher especially in the
Skin
Scalp
Nails
Hair
It cleans cool and safe the passages in the body an refreshes the mind during the process..
Okay…now some key information for you…the availability of the oil is in two foms….
3. Number one being a potent and distinctly strong smelling vegetable oil….the pure extract of neem fruits and/or seeds…that while effective in certain applications….
Number two is a more traditional herbal preparation of neem leaves….a base oil…and some water (which is cooked off in the preparation process)….This ancient ayurvedic preparation renders a far safer….more user-friendly effect on the senses…

Cool help of our ‘cool’ friend neem..
Strengthens natural immunity, particularly that of the skin
Cools and soothes skin
Cools excess heat due to increased pitta
Fosters a healthy blood system
Supports rejuvenation of healthy tissue
Owing to its excessive bitterness…it has an unbelievably cooling effect…Neem oil is actually the coolest herbalized oils used in Ayurveda….This strength of Neem with its ability to support healthy blood…makes it most balancing to pitta….Excess pitta can manifest in a number of ways…the main location being the skin…
Okay…check out our ‘cool’ friend in some detail..

1.    Medicinal neem by body mind wellness centre
2.    Cooling properties of neem by www.buzzle.com
3.   Neem by health jockey

Medicinal Properties of Neem Oil

Neem – Prolific Medicine
When we come across something which alone can fight all our ills..we tend to bow towards it and worship it…Neem is one such prolific medicine to be worshiped…
Almost every part of any Neem tree has various uses….Just to make you count…. Neem has been therapeutically used as folk medicine to control the following…
Respiratory disorders
Leprosy
Intestinal helminthiasis
Constipation

And even as a general health promoter….And there’s more it has been used to treat rheumatism….chronic syphilitic sores and indolent ulcer…….Neem oil fights various skin infections….no matter its bark…leaf…root flower and fruit together cure..
Burning sensations
Itching
Skin ulcers
Blood morbidity
Biliary afflictions
Pthysis

Medicinal properties of neem have been known to Indians since a very long time…..The earliest medical writings of Sanskrit refer to the benefits of neem’s fruits….seeds…oil…leaves…roots and bark….Each of these has been used in the Indian Ayurvedic and Unani systems of medicine don’t know since when…
It is claimed that neem can provide answers to all possibly incurable diseases….since long neem products have been used against a wide variety of diseases which include heat-rash….boils….wounds…..jaundice…..leprosy……skin disorders….stomach ulcers…..chicken pox…..
So many researchers have suggests that neem has a very bright future in medicine….It magically cures diseases like..
Ringworm
Eczema
Scabies

Neem paste…when locally applied…can cure these dermatological diseases within 3-4 days in an acute stage…preparation of neem with turmeric was found to be effective in the treatment of scabies in nearly 814 people 100…..
Neem leaf extract has been recommended for oral use for the treatment of malaria………In a recent study it was found that the lipid level….especially cholesterol…was found to be lower during therapy when compared to non-malaria patients….there is an availability of certain reports regarding the use of neem to treat patients suffering from various forms of cancer…..

It is also known that the application of neem with a certain substance when applies in the intra-vaginal region before sexual intercourse could prevent pregnancy with no adverse effect on vagina…cervix and uterus…

Enough you know of Neem’s medicinal properties..
Have a look at our references..
1. Medicinal properties of Neem: New Findingsby D.P. Agrawal
2. Neem’s medicinal uses by Neem Foundation
3. Neem for good health by Complete wellbeing

Neem – The Village Pharmacy

In ancient rural India..owing to the backwardness of it..people discovered this wondrous tree called ‘Neem’…whose benefits had no end..Let me just frame the history more formally..
IT has a grand history indeed…It was back then in 1922 that archeologists from Britain stumbled across the 5000-year-old Indus Valley archaeological site in Northwestern India….There was something really unusual and uncanny that happened…as they dug deeper the explorations should have been more primitive and simple yet instead they were rather advanced to evryone’s surprise!

In the last layers of it they discovered the cities Harappa & Mohenjodaro….and the most tantalizing factor being the cities were advanced enough to compete with the cities today…I mean as far as the construction…the engineering and everything was concerned….Just imagine…right from sanitation, drainage…and even the way the houses were constructed were spectacular..hard to believe that they belonged to such an ancient period..
And they found magic burried in deep…the most magical herb Azadirachta Indica better known as Neem….And thats how we coined the word ‘Ayurveda’…the most ancient yet modern (oxymoron it is I know) medical system…and its chief tool being….nothing else but Neem

When it comes down to the medicinal properties of neem..they’re even mentioned in the most ancient of books like the Veda’s….So explicitly mentioned in the Veda’s are the benefits of Neem that nothing else holds a position higher than the amazing tree…thats how we know that the population of India…centuries ago…fearlessly used Neem for any and every ill of theirs…and hence named it ‘the village pharmacy’.

You know something that’ll draw you more towards neem is that it’s actually the chief ingredient of all blood purifiers….and even in medicines of Diabetic people… It cures..
The removal of external and internal parasites
Including-

  • Malaria
  • Fevers
  • Arthritis
  • Rheumatism
  • As an insect repellent

Though yet it is best at saving our teeth from decaying…. Dont know how many researches and studies now are staunch crusaders of the plant..
Understand it even more deeply…explore these reference links..

1. Neem tree-Azadirachta indica by Steve Nix
2. Neem- The village pharmacy by vedicheritaginc.com
3. Neem_ Village Pharmacy by www.neemtree.info

High Antioxidants Factor – Neem Oil

Neem seed oil is one extremely strong and antiseptic oil. The oil has in it the compounds that are ver sought after and together make a miraculous potion in the form of neem seed oil. The oil is actually worshipped in certain parts of the world.

Neem leaves, bark and oil are all high in antioxidants. Antioxidants are compounds in plants that reverse and prevent cell damage. Free radicals come from natural sources, such as foods and oxygen, and from unnatural sources, such as chemicals in the air and the water that we use and in the foods that we eat. According to a study conducted by Brunswick Laboratories, neem bark, leaves and oil are four to five times higher in antioxidants than -

  • Blueberries
  • Cranberries

Oil derived from neem leaves, bark and seeds has a wide range of antibacterial and antimicrobial properties, according to Agrawal. Neem oil is particularly effective for mouth and gum infections. Swish with a mild solution of neem oil and water for optimal oral health. Use neem oil topically on wounds to prevent infection during healing. And try taking a neem extract supplement or drinking neem tea to prevent bacterial infections.

The antiviral properties of neem are found in the seed oil, neem leaves and leaf oil. Neem can also help prevent dengue fever, a viral infection that is transported by mosquitoes in some tropical regions. If you have access to a neem tree, nibbling 10 to 20 of the bitter leaves in the morning can help prevent viral infections. Neem extracts are also available as supplements and neem oil is widely available in health food stores.

Neem oil has spermicidal properties. Using a cotton pad soaked in neem oil for 15 minutes before intercourse may prevent pregnancy. There is speculation that for women, eating fresh neem leaves daily may prevent contraception and for men, consuming fresh neem leaves for a month may cause reversible infertility. However, further research is required, and neem should not be relied upon for birth control or disease prevention.

Neem oil or Margosa oil is botanical oil extracted from kernel of neem tree seed by Solvent Extraction or Cold Pressing or CT Cold Pressing method. Among these methods CT cold pressing yield purest neem oil because solvent is not used for extraction.

Go through our reference links now -

1. The many health benefits of neem by writer1
2. Neem and environment by www.neemfoundation.org
3. Neem is good for by www.discoverneem.com

Branches Of Goodness – Neem’s Top 5

I am sure you must have heard and read chunks about neem and even the oilo that is obtained from it. They are highly antiseptic in nature and top the list of naturally therapeutic and edicinal oils. That is just one reason why neem is so popular all over the world.

  1.  Psoriasis: In clinical studies Neem extracts and oil were found to be as effective as coal tar and cortisone in treating psoriasis. However there were none of the usual side effects accompanying the use of Neem as there was with Coal tar and cortisone. When applied to the skin, Neem extracts and oil removed the redness and itching while improving the condition of the skin for the duration of the treatment.
  2.  Diabetes: Whether drinking a simple cup of tea out of the leaves or taking extracts of the Neem leaf, Neem significantly and consistently reduced insulin requirements for nonkeytonic, insulin fast, and insulin sensitive forms of Diabetes. Because of the numerous and successful clinical studies with Neem on Diabetes, the Indian equivalent of the FDA has approved the manufacture and sale of Neem tablets, by Pharmaceutical companies, for the treatment of Diabetes.
  3. Dental disease: In the old days, the people in India did not use neem toothpaste. They used neem toothbrushes instead. Chewing on a neem twig has for many centuries been the commonly preferred way to prevent gum disease and maintain healthy teeth.In a study to determine the most effective method for reducing plaque formation and the level of bacteria on tooth surfaces researchers compared antibiotics to a number of plant materials with known antibacterial properties, including neem. They found that microorganisms found in inflamed gums and resistant to penicillin (44%) and tetracycline (30%) but were not resistant to antibacterial plant extracts like neem. And unlike antibiotics, antibacterial plant extracts produced no allergy in the gingiva that could inhibit their effectiveness.
  4. Cancer: For centuries in India and Southeast Asia Ayurvedic practitioners and herbalists have successfully used Neem to reduce tumors. Clinical research performed in Europe and India using the polysaccharides and limonoids found in Neem bark, leaves, and seeds demonstrated some remarkable effects against cancers. These compounds not only reduced tumors and cancers but were also effective against lymphocytic leukemia. An amazing reduction in tumor size was reported when Neem extracts were injected around the tumors.
  5.  Herpes: Recent tests in Germany show that Neem is toxic to herpes simplex viruses. Neem exhibits antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, and astringent properties. The leaf and oil of this tree has been used for centuries in Southern Asia for maintaining beautiful and healthy skin.

Have a look at oour reference links now -

1. Neem tree-Azadirachta indica by Steve Nix
2. Neem- The village pharmacy by vedicheritaginc.com
3. Neem_ Village Pharmacy by www.neemtree.info