Neem Oil And Life’s Integradtion

Neem essential oil has many uses and there are a number of ways the oil of it can be used in daily life for various routinely benefits and uses. Neem essential oil is wonderful at healing and curing diseases and injuries.

Neem Oil is used in insecticide manufacturing because it contains azadirachtin which effects over 600 species of pests including insects, nematodes, fungi and viruses and is completely safe to non target organisms like predators, honey bees, pollinators, fish, birds, cattle and human beings.

Azadirachtin of neem oil is a famous natural Anti-feedent, growth regulator and ovi-positional repellent for insects, as a major active ingredient which make it a perfect alternative to chemical pesticides.

Neem Oil or Neem Seed Oil is a brownish Yellow color Liquid, with smell of Garlic. Neem Oil is slightly soluble in water and has 6.5 to 7.5 Ph value, it boils at more than 200 degree Celsius and freeze at 13 degree Celsius.

In India, neem is known as “the village pharmacy” because of its healing versatility, and it has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for more than 4,000 years due to its medicinal properties.

This tree is considered to be of divine origin. According to Indian mythology, amrita (ambrosia or the elixir of immortality) was being carried to heaven and a few drops of it fell on the Neem tree.

Another story tells of the time the Sun took refuge in the Neem Tree to escape from the awesome powers of the demons.

Some common practices involving the Neem tree integrated in the Indian lifestyle have been:

  • Sleeping and resting under the Neem tree
  • Burning Neem leaves and twigs to ward off mosquitoes
  • Growing the tree in the vicinity to purify the atmosphere
  • Hanging Neem twigs and leaves at doors for protection against communicable diseases.
  • Spreading Neem leaves near persons suffering from infectious diseases.
  • Bathing with water in which a few Neem leaves have been boiled
  • Greeting the Groom with fresh Neem twigs at weddings, to ward off evil
  • Putting dried Neem leaves in folds of clothes and in stored grain
  • Chewing a Neem stick for oral hygiene first thing in the morning
  • Increasing the shelf –life of vegetables and fruits by packing the produce with neem leaves in baskets.
  • Adding neem leaves to the feed of milch cattle
  • Puddling neem leaves and twigs in rice fields

Have a look at our reference links now -

1. The many health benefits of neem by writer1
2. Neem and environment by www.neemfoundation.org
3. Neem is good for by www.discoverneem.com

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