Saving Grace Of Medicine – Neem Seed Oil

For centuries millions of people have benefited from using various parts of the neem tree. Its recognized traditional uses are being confirmed by modern research findings. During the last 20 years more than 2000 research papers have been published on neem in journals, books and proceedings of international congresses.

Neem tree in totality has been a village dispensary and a qualified plant by itself. Every part of this plant finds use as medicine for itching, skin disease, leprosy, blood disorders, worms, diabetes, piles, dysentery, jaundice, vomiting, wounds, eye disease, paraplegia, female genital diseases and all kinds of fevers.

More than 150 compounds have been so far isolated from neem. Out of these seed accord for 101 including 43 from the malodorous fraction, the leaves 37; and flowers, bark and root furnish the rest. Following are some of the diseases that this oil deals with, very effectively.

  • Herpes: Recent tests in Germany show that Neem is toxic to herpes simplex viruses. Neem exhibits antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, and astringent properties. The leaf and oil of this tree has been used for centuries in Southern Asia for maintaining beautiful and healthy skin.
  • Kidney stone: Taking neem tea is not only good to prevent kidney stone, but also for the treatment against this disease, helping to dissolve the stones.
  • Dermatology: Neem’s antibacterial and antiallergic properties make it effective in tackling skin problems such as acne, psoriasis and eczema. In Ayurveda, epidermal problems were believed to be caused by raised sugar levels in the body and Neem’s bitter taste was said to balance out excess sugar. Besides, Neem cream is an excellent anti-wrinkles.
  • Ulcers. The traditional use of neem seed oil against ulcers is well supported by in vivo laboratory evidence, both for the protection of gastric and duodenal mucosa against stress-induced or chemically induced lesions, and for the enhancement of the healing process in chronic gastric lesions induced by acetic acid (Pillai & Santhakumari 1984). Blockade of histamine receptors is suggested as a possible mechanism for this effect.

Go through our reference links now -

  1. Neem Seed Oil by Buzzle
  2. Neem by Hub Pages
  3. Neem by Livestrong

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